Archive for December 1981

The Klipsch X4i Review   Leave a comment

You are safe in the knowledge that I bring the very best headphone content pieces, some of them are my very own a few of which are curated by me, if i choose to use someone elses writing it’s because it’s appropriate to my readership, so feel confident you are reading the best from my industry.

headphonesBass-boosted earphones are so much the norm at this point that to release a pair with merely moderate bass response almost seems like a gamble. So, credit is due to Klipsch—the X4i, at $149.99 (direct) represents the mix with clarity and brightness, and not gobs of booming bass. It can still reproduce sub-bass lows that you’ll find on electronic and hip hop tracks, but it does so without allowing them to overtake the mids and highs of the mix. The non-flashy, all-business Klipsch X4i makes a strong case for the attention of those seeking a near-flat response earphone pair. An inline remote control and microphone for mobile devices, as well as a healthy portion of included accessories, adds to the X4i’s value.

Design
You could call it a victory of substance over style—visually, the X4i is fairly barebones and nondescript, but in no way unattractive. A black linguini-esque cable and the bronze Klipsch logo emblazoned on the outer earpieces are the only real design elements to speak of. The miniature metallic rimmed earpieces don’t tug down on the ears with much weight at all, which makes the fit secure and comfortable over long listening periods.

An inline three-button remote control and microphone for iOS devices allows for answering calls, playback and track navigation control, as well as volume adjustments. Klipsch X4i inline

A total of five eartip pairs ship with the X4i, in a variety of sizes and shapes—most are standard rounded clear silicone eartips, but there also flange-shaped options. The X4i also ships with a tiny black zip-up protective pouch and a shirt clip.

Performance
On tracks with serious sub-bass content, like the Knife’s “Silent Shout,” the X4i delivers the deep bass without distortion, even at top, unsafe listening levels. However, any bass fiends seeking super-boosted low-end will likely be disappointed with the X4i, which can handle subwoofer style bass, but delivers it in a subtle, dialed-back manner. There’s plenty of low-end here compared to a clinical-sounding, strictly flat-response pair, but the X4i’s sound signature favors the mids and highs, and an overall crispness, over booming lows.

This means on a track like Bill Callahan’s “Drover,” the vocals, guitar strumming, and percussion attacks are front and center, with a brightness and clarity that is striking. Equally noteworthy is the lack of over-the-top bass boosting—the drumming on this track can often receive a ridiculous amount of low-end from an overly bass-boosted pair, sounding unnatural and overtaking the balance of the mix. Through the X4i, however, the drums hardly sound as if they’ve received any low-end boosting at all—bass fans might even find them a tad thin, but this is not a track with a serious level of deep bass to begin with.

Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild,” on the other hand, has both intense sub-bass presence and an all-important percussive high-mid presence. The attack of the kick drum bass loop gets all of the treble edge it needs (and is often denied on bass-heavy earphones) to slice through the mix and stand in the forefront of the mix, along with the vocals. However, the sub-bass synth hits sound a bit weak here—we can hear their treble attack, as well, but we don’t get any of the thunderous sustain like you would on a PA system or an earphone or headphone pair with heavy sub-bass response. The end result is that while the track sounds crisp and clear, it’s not exactly like you’re at the club.

Classical tracks, like John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances,” can sound a tad edgy and bright, and lacking in the lows. We get a great sense of the higher register strings and percussion, and the growl of brass instruments, but there’s not much in the way of bass presence here. The lower register strings don’t sound dead or devoid of low-end altogether, but they definitely take a backseat in the mix.

Basically, this is a pair for those who prefer near-flat-response sound signatures that favor mids and highs, crispness and clarity, without foregoing bass completely. The X4i has a certain level of richness in the lows, but by today’s standards, it is subtle. A breath of fresh air for me, but if you prefer mega-bass, you’ll want to steer your attention to the SOL Republic Amps HD In-Ear Headphones or the substantially more expensive Denon Urban Raver AH-C300 In-Ear Headphones, both solid in-ear options with more low-end power, if less overall balance in the mix. And if all of these are out of the your price range, consider the slightly less expensive Moshi Keramo, which offers a similar sound signature to the X4i, as does the TDK EB950 which sells online for a serious markdown from its list price. At $150, the Klipsch X4i delivers quality audio performance in a simple design, equipped with an inline remote and a fair amount of accessories. Bass lovers need not apply, but lovers of crisp or flat audio are encouraged to check the distortion-free, comfortable X4i out.

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Posted December 28, 1981 by ferdinandpuckett in Uncategorized

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New Electric Buses, improving arrival time!   Leave a comment

So to continue my run of posts on this website, I’ve decided to share one of our favourite content pieces this week. I was cautious to add it to the website because I really did not want to offend the original author, but I trust he/she is glad that I enjoyed reading their work and planned to share it with my readers.

Eight experimental electric buses will be operating in Milton Keynes from late January onwards. The fleet will begin operating along the busy Number 7 route, which covers the 15 miles between Wolverton and Bletchley. They are the first electric buses to operate in the UK.

UK-based bus manufacturer Wrightbus have built these new electric buses in conjunction with Japanese company Mitsui and UK engineering group Arup.

Wireless ‘booster’ plates in the road, placed at the beginning/end of the route, give the buses a charge that allows them to operate for a full day. They are then charged overnight at the bus depot.

The buses will need to stop over the booster plates, before lowering the bus’ own receiver plates and resting there for 10 minutes’ charge time. The journey will then resume, exactly the same way a regular bus ride does.

The process is called ‘inductive charging’ and it involves electricity passing though wire coils in the plates that creates a magnetic field. The field then shares its voltage with the bus’ receiver plates, charging them up.

Similar electric bus trials are being implemented in Italy, the Netherlands and Germany. In 2013, South Korea unveiled a 7.5-mile stretch of road, which recharges electric vehicles as they drive over it, without requiring any charge time at all.

In an interview with the BBC, John Bint of Milton Keynes Council said, “Electric buses have huge potential and we’re exploring how they can help us take better care of the environment without compromising passenger service,”

If these trial models prove to be successful, the Council plans to run them all across the town.

The environmental impact of this scheme is certainly considerable, with local councils potentially being able to significantly reduce their area’s carbon footprint. In addition, the future development of electric buses can only help the similar evolution of the electric car, an invention that has the potential to seriously lower the world’s carbon emissions.

Arup consultant John Miles who is also an engineering professor at Cambridge University, told BBC that, “These electric buses will be expected to do everything a diesel bus does (…) They will be operating on a demanding urban route, and that’s all part of the trial’s aim – to prove that electric buses can be tough as well as green.”

Posted December 19, 1981 by ferdinandpuckett in Uncategorized

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